FOGG app

Design thinking and Main screens for a meeting app

Role

Senior Product Designer

Deliverables

Research

Architecture + Flows

First screens

Technologies

Android

iOS

Problem statement

My client was in need to design a meeting app from scratch without knowing much about the market and the competitors.

I organized the roadmap for the project and arranged the recurrent meetings and ceremonies. Participating in the reviews with the branding agencies was crucial to influence decisions and advocating for good use of color and assets for the different digital product instances.

I used design thinking and design sprint methodology, alongside different design tools for the project.

Execution

Discovery:

I researched the market for our direct competitors and inspiration. It is important to look for other products that use similar solutions and ways of solving similar problems. Gathering inspiration is a huge part of this process.

Research questions and Assumptions and answers are useful tools to help define opportunities and possible pain points.

I set up regular meetings with stakeholders involving them in reviews, walkthroughs, and workshops. Based on this first research, I defined a series of essential functionalities that were needed as well as the tone of voice that would be used across the app.

Architecture + flows:

In the exploration phase, I tackled story mapping to define functionality and align priorities for the MVP and future states of the development of the app. I also defined the architecture flow for the first iteration.

This helped me develop the first flow and understand better how the architecture was behaving.

Color for the UI:

Following the branding materials and in close collaboration with the brand agency I helped shape a better palette to suit the digital needs of the product and comply with accessibility.

First screens:

Following the wireframes I created a basic UI kit to develop the main screens for the app to present in the investors meeting.

Patterns:

I also used this exercise to think about error handling and come up with a definition of good practice patterns.

This project inspired some articles you can find below:

Error handling